23: Joe Lindley And Pam Howell React To Taubes vs. Guyenet

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Today Jimmy and Mindy welcome Joe Lindley and Pam Howell to Episode 23 of Low-Carb Conversations with Jimmy Moore and Friends! We’ve got two amazing “friends” to gab today about whether they’d ever eat any “odd” animal parts, their take on the squabble between Gary Taubes and Stephan Guyenet that started at the recent Ancestral Health Symposium, and delicious recipe ideas for you to try in your low-carb kitchen. So pull up a chair, grab a cup of coffee and let’s talk about what’s happening with low-carb living on the Virtual Porch!

Special THANK YOU to our sponsor: Skogg Kettlebell System

LINKS MENTIONED IN EPISODE 23
- Support our sponsor: Skogg Kettlebell System
- Pam Howell on Facebook
- Joe Lindley on Twitter
- Joe’s “Stop Craving Sugar” blog
- Jimmy Moore’s Adventures In ‘Odd Bits’: Cow Tongue
- Stephan Guyenet’s “The Carbohydrate Hypothesis of Obesity: a Critical Examination”
- Joe’s response to Guyenet’s column

Low Carb BBQ Brisket Prepared in a Smoker and Cooked Twice

Since this recipe is nothing but meat (and rub) it is low-carb.  I use an electric smoker to get the smoke flavor and also to produce a flavorful “bark” (blackened outside surface) that provides a great deal of flavor.  Since briskets come in 8 to 12 lb. sizes, this makes enough meat for several meals.   Portions can be easily frozen for use later on.

Low Carb BBQ Brisket Recipe, Double-Cooked in a Smoker
5.0 from 1 reviews
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Recipe type: Entree
Author: Joe Lindley
Prep time: 30 mins
Cook time: 27 hours
Total time: 27 hours 30 mins
Serves: 12
Low Carb BBQ Brisket (Smoked Beef Brisket) prepared in a Smoker and double-cooked to provide tasty Burnt Ends. This recipe provides tender sliced BBQ beef and chopped BBQ beef.
A smoker is used in this example, however an oven or roaster oven can be used with liquid smoke to obtain the smoky flavor. The oven approach won’t provide as much of the “bark” outer surface characteristic of smoked beef.
Ingredients
  • 8-12 lb. Beef Brisket with the “fat cap” (see Notes) (Select or Choice Grade)
  • Dry Rub (Gordons Grub Rub)
  • Optional Spices for Chopped Brisket (be careful to just spice lightly to punch it up):
  • Coarse Pepper
  • Coarse Sea Salt
  • Onion Flakes
  • Dried Tomatoes (Sprinkles – in a ground form)
  • Cayenne Pepper
Instructions
  1. Set Smoker to 225 Degrees
  2. Wash the brisket with water and dry off
  3. Rub in the dry rub on all surfaces of the Brisket, especially the fat side
  4. Put the Brisket into the Smoker (fat side up) and leave for 1.25 hr. per lb. (i.e. 12.5 hr for a 10 lb brisket)
  5. Remove the Brisket from the smoker and remove the “flat” (Video 2) for refrigeration/freezing and use later.
  6. Immediately wrap the “fat cap” in aluminum foil (two or three layers – Video 2)
  7. Put the fat cap back into the smoker for another 1.25 hr. per lb. (i.e. 12.5 hr for 10 lb brisket)
  8. Remove the fat cap from the smoker, remove meat from it (see video), and chop it up.
  9. Combine all of the chopped fat cap (burnt ends) with some of the flat (chopped) and spice very lightly with the optional spices of your choice to produce chopped BBQ beef.
  10. A suggestion is to save half of the flat for slicing and use as a more formal sliced BBQ entree.
  11. The chopped BBQ from this is spicy enough that, to serve as an entree, it can just be sprinkled with olive oil, reheated in a microwave, and served as is.
Serving size: 10 Calories: 561 Fat: 30 grams Saturated fat: 11 grams Unsaturated fat: 19 grams Protein: 69 grams Cholesterol: 216 mg
Notes

Check the “trim” of the brisket: Sometimes the fat on both sides is completely trimmed off, which is NOT what you want. You want a brisket that has one lean side with the fat trimmed off (called the flat) and one fatty side that has fat over the entire length of the brisket. On the fatty side there should be a thick knot of fat at one end, sometimes intermingled with meat, called the “fat cap”.

Plan ahead: The brisket will be in the smoker for a long time – two long stretches. You don’t want to end up messing with it in the middle of the night. For briskets, 2 hours or so of smoke is about right, so after you’ve finished the smoke phase, you may, if you prefer, transfer the brisket to a preheated oven or roaster oven for the remainder of the cook time, wrapped in aluminum foil in a deep pan to catch the juices.

  • Anonymous

    What was the name of the bars that Pam mentioned at the end?

    • Anonymous

      Quest Bars if my memory serves correct.