22: Barbara Rose And Dean Dwyer: A Paleo Guy And Weston Price Gal Discuss Body Image, Carb-Cutting And More!

22: Barbara Rose And Dean Dwyer: A Paleo Guy And Weston Price Gal Discuss Body Image, Carb-Cutting And More!

Right-click to save audio file.

 

| Open Player in New Window

Barbara Rose and Dean Dwyer join Jimmy and Mindy on today’s installment of Low-Carb Conversations with Jimmy Moore and Friends!

Weston A. Price fan Barbara Rose and Paleo blogger/vlogger Dean Dwyer chew the fat and talk about loving the body you’ve got in order to fix it and the unsolicited advice in a recent newspaper column to “…be careful when cutting carbs!” We’ve got all this and so much more to follow, so pull up a chair, grab a cup of coffee and join us on our Virtual Porch for a great low-carb gabfest!

LINKS MENTIONED IN EPISODE 22
– Support our sponsor: Skogg Kettlebell System
– Barbara Rose on Facebook
– Dean Dwyer on Facebook
– Dean Dwyer’s “Being Primal” web site
– “You Can’t Fix A Body You Hate”
– Times Union column “Be Cautious When Cutting Back On Carbs”

  • Barbara’s daughter G.

    What an interesting conversation! And thanks for the shout-out, Mom, I’m very proud of you.

    • Anonymous

      She did great!

  • Ivallejos77

    Jimmy, so did you also cut out raw milk?

    • Anonymous

      All dairy. For now.

  • @~25min Re: safe starches and fruit

    Mathieu Lalonde has talked about ‘physiological insulin resistance’ vs ‘pathological insulin resistance’ on carbohydrate restricted, and starving diets saying it induces insulin resistance on muscle (but not pathogenic) and muscle soak up triglycerides to spare glucose for the brain: Cites studies at 25min30s:
    http://robbwolf.com/2011/02/22/the-paleo-solution-episode-68/ and at 28min46s he mentions people failing glucose tolerance test. He also challenges Tim Ferriss’ Book 37min in saying eating fructose (maybe when you eat the fruit in n=1) will stimulate liver to soak up glucose as well (thus lowering the glycemic impact, at the expense of liver). I think ChrisKresser, too, mentioned glucose tolerance test in similar vein when he was a guest on RobbWolf http://robbwolf.com/?s=chris+kresser

    Hyperlipid (a blog GaryTaubes and Guyenet respect admitted on your podcast) wrote this on failing glucose tolerance tests on low carb eaters and recommends they eat 150g carbs for 3 days to pass it:
    http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/2007/10/physiological-insulin-resistance.html

    “However, while muscles are in “refusal mode” for glucose the least input, from food or gluconeogenesis, will rapidly spike blood glucose out of all proportion. This is fine if you stick to LC in your eating. It also means that if you take an oral glucose tolerance test you will fail and be labelled diabetic. In fact, even a single high fat meal can do this, extending insulin resistance in to the next day. Here’s a reference for this.

    The general opinion in LC circles is that you need 150g of carbohydrate per day for three days before an oral glucose tolerance test [link].

    I did this carb loading thing, then performed my own OGTT. It came out very normal except for mild reactive hypoglycaemia. ”

    So maybe 3 days of safe starches and on the 4th day try “n=1” (like Chris Masterjohn suggests http://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=229341197115537&id=108150349220602 )

    • And here is a n=1 type II diabetic post on someone following Paul Jaminet perfecthealthdiet.com diet for a bit:

      ‘Nervous About Perfect Health Diet ‘ http://lowcarbwisdom.blogspot.com/2011/08/nervous-about-perfect-health-diet.html & http://lowcarbwisdom.blogspot.com/2011/09/why-taubes-has-groupies.html

    • What’s everyone experience with this comment (from the hyperlipid high-fat blog linked above):

      “I’ve noticed that since I’ve reduced my carb intake, eating a high-carb meal kicks my butt. I feel like… my blood glucose is through the roof and all my proteins are being glycated!! Seriously, I feel warm all over and tired as if I were having a systemic inflammatory response. Although it may just be my overactive imagination.”

      Has anyone found this to be true anecdotally, and then after eating 150g of carbohydrate or more for a few days (3 or more) tolerate carbohydrate easier?

  • Erika H

    @Gavin – I agree. I remember when ‘low carb’ was cutting-edge 5-6 years ago, and if you read the websites and discussions there was none of this ‘it’s not about losing weight’ talk. To the contrary, actually; it was seen as pretty much the ANSWER for weight loss. But now, if you look at those same sites and forums (the few that are still around from back then), what do you see? Some of the very same people STILL trying to make low carb ‘work for them’. Yeah, clearly something’s not working here…LOL. So yeah, you’re right – many are now going ‘paleo’ for this reason. Where I think they’re wrong, though, is in referring to these two ways of eating as ‘kissing cousins’ (as I heard you say, Jimmy). You certainly won’t hear many of the original thinkers behind paleo saying that…

  • CarbSanity

    No one can claim to objectively disseminate information about health/nutrition when they have a vested financial interest in the outcome – or, “a dog in the fight”, as ya’ll say down South. 😉 Say what you will about bloggers such as Richard Nikoley or Dr. Kurt Harris or CarbSane, at least they’re not influenced by the almighty dollar. Alas, though, as certain prominent elements of ‘low carb’ have become the new nutritional establishment, many brave voices are being censored and rendered nonpersons in the very forums in which they should by all rights have a presence. As someone once said, “Power corrupts; absolute power corrupts absolutely”.

    Indeed.

  • Fred Rodgers

    @ Gavin:

    One of the best series of blog posts about the HAES-ization of LC –

    http://carbsanity.blogspot.com/2011/06/is-lc-morphing-to-haes-part-vi-at-least.html

  • Gavin

    @Fred,

    Her style can be a bit abrasive (what’s up with all the ad hominem? Funny and true as some of it was…), but overall I think she’s on the money. No wonder she seems to be LLVLC public enemy no. 1…LOL. But seriously, I think if this movement has a future, it’s with people like her. Of course right now they’re going to be shunned (apparently Jimmy even kicked her off his forum), but you watch, in time everyone will be claiming they agreed with them all along – especially once it trickles down to the public at large that Taubes’ carb hypothesis has been thoroughly debunked.

  • JanisInNC

    “Taubes’ carb hypothesis has been thoroughly debunked.”

    Sorry but this is not a fact. I should know I been doing Atkins for ten years and THIS time its gonna work.

    Thank you Jimmy for all you do. God Bless.

    • Gavin

      Ten years?! I rest my case.

  • Jimmy,

    I just listened to this latest podcast. I’m interested to see how you fare on the “safe carbs,” but I think people get the wrong impression of what makes them “safe.”

    They are not safe from a carb/starch/glucose/calorie perspective, but safe in the sense that they tend to be far less likely to irritate the gut and/or cause inflammation in and of themselves.

    In the land of Paleo, sweet potatoes have long been a safe carb, but recently people have been experimenting more with white rice, nixtamalized corn (aka, the soaked and hulled corn used for tortillas and tamales), and some potatoes.

    If I’m trying to get slim (or am having trouble staying slim) I still minimize them like I would yams or sweet potatoes, even though these safe carbs don’t make me feel like crap like wheat or brown rice does. 🙂

    Roland

    • Anonymous

      I appreciate that, Roland. But using terminology like “safe” carb gives unsuspecting people permission to consume them without consequence. For the metabolically damaged, that’s not a good thing.

      • Exactly! I think that’s one area where the overlap between Low Carb and Paleo can get confusing. The terms don’t always mean the same thing, depending on your angle of approach.

        • Anonymous

          Correct. And unfortunately most people with obesity and diabetes are metabolically deranged.