77: Laura Dolson And Sam Gaucher Discuss Schools Telling Parents Their Kid Is Obese

77: Laura Dolson And Sam Gaucher Discuss Schools Telling Parents Their Kid Is Obese

Laura Dolson from “About.com Low-Carb Diets” and Sam Gaucher from “Canada Girl Eats Paleo” join Dietitian Cassie and guest co-host Kevin Kennedy-Spaien in Episode 77 of “Low-Carb Conversations With Jimmy Moore & Friends!

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While Jimmy is off at the PaleoFX conference in Austin, Texas and finishing up his cholesterol book project, Cassie and Kevin were lucky enough to be joined by yet another Canuck, Sam as well as the very wise and insightful Laura to discuss a Huffington Post column on the obesity problem, the continued misinformation being put out there about saturated fat and cholesterol, diet soda’s role in obesity, a woman who advocates eating MORE fat for health, a school sending letters home to parents saying their child is obese, why antibiotics are probably not a good idea for children and Laura’s column on what we should be calling the way we eat now. Plus, don’t miss great low-carb pizza and shish kebab recipes at the end from our guest friends. You know what to do–pull up a chair, grab a cup of coffee and let’s talk!

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LINKS MENTIONED IN EPISODE 77:
– We’re LISTENER-SUPPORTED: DONATE HERE!
Laura Dolson from “About.com Low-Carb Diets”
Sam Gaucher from “Canada Girl Eats Paleo”
The Heavy
Eat Your Heart Out
– VIDEO: Forget Cholesterol; Inflammation’s The Real Enemy  
How Diet Soda Makes you Fat (and other food and diet industry secrets)
Winchester Woman advocates for diet that encourages eating fat
School tells parents son is obese
Fat Letters Informing Parents Their Kid is Obese are Not Solving Childhood Obesity
You Kid Probably Doesn’t Need Antibiotics
What Should We Call ourselves? (by Laura Dolson!)
Laura’s “Low-Carb Pizza” recipe
Sam’s “Indoor Shish Kebab” recipe

  • June Kryk

    OK, I do have a bone to pick. If you are going to closely examine studies that do not support your beliefs and find all the flaws you can’t just blindly accept studies that do support your beliefs. For the study linking diet sodas to diabetes, this is the second time it has been referenced in the podcast. I don’t see where anyone went back to the original studies and dissected them in the same way I’ve seen the “Meat will Kill You” studies dissected. I’m not saying that drinking a liter of diet soda a day is good for you, I’m just saying that you must apply the same standards to studies you feel support your position as you do to studies you disagree with.

    • kevinks

      This is a great comment, and exactly the kind of conversation I love to see! I’ll ask you what I’d ask any guest: what do you know about this and what personal conclusions have you drawn from what you know?

      Do you find sufficient evidence in favor of the theory that artificial sweeteners contribute to unhealthy fluctuations in insulin, do you think the science isn’t in yet, or that it’s all a bunch of hooey, June?

      • June Kryk

        I haven’t really looked at the science for artifical sweetners, so I can’t say one way or another. I’m just talking about how this particular study was presented.
        Going back to the original study. First,it was an observational study. It was not an interventional study. Correlation does not equal causation.
        Second, they gave the women a survey about their beverage habits for the previous year. This is a red flag, as these kind of questionnaires are notoriously inaccurate. Third, and worst of all, they then followed the women for 14 years, BUT they did not continue to assess the women’s beverage habits for that time. From the study section on limitations:
        “Another limitation was that information on beverage consumption was not updated during the follow-up, and dietaryhabits may have changed over time.”
        So for all we or the authors know, all of the women drinking sugared sodas could have switched to sugar-free sodas and vice-versa. Truth is, we have no idea what these women were drinking over the 14 years of the study or how it impacted their chances of developing T2D,
        This is exactly the kind of thing that authors of a ‘meat kills’ study did and the low carb community thouroughly blasted them for. I’m just saying that we need to apply the same standards for all studies or we have no credibility.

        • kevinks

          That’s an excellent caveat. If you’d like to come on the show to discuss this further, let us know!